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Past Shows

  • Johanna Poethig – Big Band Bowling Pins
  • Author avatar
    Patricia Sweetow
  • ceramic sculptureceramicsJohanna Poethigsculpture

Johanna Poethig – Big Band Bowling Pins

 

 

 

 

Spun Smoke is pleased to present Johanna Poethig, Big Band Bowling Pins in our front Bay window on Telegraph Avenue in Oakland, on view beginning August 19th, ending October 1. In addition to Johanna's installation you're invited to join us Saturday, September 17th for a special event, a reading of her High Stakes Divination Cards. "Divination is a ritual of signs and omens in an attempt to organize seemingly unrelated events and logics.  The dread and humor of daily life, the architecture of our social lives, the symbols of culture, odd behaviors, pleasures and pain, obsession with the tactics of empire, environmental meltdown and open sourced, random scavenged images are my vocabulary." Come early, join us for a glass of wine and be one of 2 possible readings beginning at 2:30 pm.

 

 We expect the Telegraph Avenue window to come alive with Poethig's humor, wit and insight. Johanna sets the stage, "The Big Bang Bowling Pins explode at the origin of the universe.  There is a test of skill, the judgement of character, the game of life, the vanity of winners and the end of an epoch  embodied in this Extreme Sport of bowling.  Pins fly, lie shattered and stand in formation. The Harlequin Amphibian Pins are already extinct and look alarmed. The masked pins are prepared to survive in riot gear, radiation and viral protective clothing and Japanese school girl fetish fashions."

 

 Bowling balls and pins were found in the tomb of an Egyptian king who died in 5,200 B.C. The ancient Polynesians bowled on lanes that were 60 feet long, the same as today. Bowling as we know it began in Germany sometime during the fifth century. People pretended that the pins were devils and they used a round rock or heavy ball as a weapon to knock them down. If successful, it indicated they were overcoming the temptations of the devil in their lives. If not, their lives still had too many sins.

 

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  • Author avatar
    Patricia Sweetow
  • ceramic sculptureceramicsJohanna Poethigsculpture